Category: Machine Finance Sector

Yorkshire Machinery Finance for Farms

From tractors, headers or balers, if it’s part of a working farm Richmond Asset Finance can finance it! At Richmond Asset Finance we have access to an experienced panel of lenders so we can bring you only the best finance options for your farm machinery and business.

Agriculture is very diverse and we also understand that that some farmers have seasonal income, so we can tailor seasonal loan structures for certain applicants if the situation calls for it.

We also understand that a 1998 tractor might still be in good working condition, so older farm machinery can be financed from both private sellers and dealers. Simply ask us for more details.

We can offer agriculture finance loans for the following vehicles and equipment:

  • Tractors
  • Harvesters
  • Spraying Equipment
  • Spreaders
  • Seeders
  • Offset Disc
  • Balers
  • Irrigation
  • Telehandlers

Have farm equipment or machinery that’s not on the list? Call us and we’ll be happy to help: 0113 288 3277

Finance Options

Typical Finance Types, uses and descriptions

1. Farm Finance, Rural Finance

An all embracing term we use to describe all types of farm and agricultural finance we offer in the rural and country business sectors and which can also be described as Agricultural Finance, Equestrian Finance, Farm Finance, Land Finance and Horticultural Finance. Finance can be provided for holiday complexes, caravan parks, caravan sites, properties with agricultural restrictions, land, buildings, working farms, non-working farms, nurseries, garden centres, smallholdings, estates, fisheries, farm shops and generally all types of rural type situations.

2. Agricultural Loan, Loan for Agriculture, Loans for Agriculture

More commonly described as an Agricultural Mortgage, Mortgage for Agriculture, Agricultural Re-mortgage or Re-mortgage for Agriculture being a loan secured by a first charge over property in UK, England. In some cases a loan may be secured by way of a second charge over this type of property.

3. Bridging Loan, Bridging Finance

This is a short-term arrangement whereby a loan is secured either by way of a first charge or second charge on property in England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. Usually, but not always, interest is rolled up or added to the account so that all the money is repaid by the end of the term, meaning that no monthly payments are made.

Farmers cannot be the forgotten heroes of the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has amplified the uncertainty and fragility of the conditions within which farmers operate.

The coronavirus pandemic has caused us all to become acutely aware of our own mental health, as a “new normal” has emerged. In the UK, there is sharp focus on the mental health of keyworkers supporting the nation in an array of fields such as the NHS, social care and education, but one industry’s contribution that should not be overlooked is the farming and agricultural workforce.

Seasonal labour

Concerns around levels of seasonal labour also predates the pandemic, and concerns have been raised by those within the industry throughout the Brexit debate. UK seasonal farming has been chronically understaffed since the UK voted to Leave and the value of the pound fell. As has been widely documented, an estimated 70,000 seasonal workers are required throughout the year, and around 90 percent of those are from outside the UK. But with restrictions on travel due to coronavirus, farmers in the agricultural, horticultural and dairy industries in particular are reporting severe labour issues.

The Government recently launched its “Pick for Britain” campaign to mobilise a land army of British pickers to help fill farm vacancies. This did not come without concerns from farmers, as many seasonal workers are normally returnees, arriving at the start of the season fully trained in the necessary skills and machinery to hit the ground running. By stark contrast, training new UK recruits can be costly and initially result in lower productivity. Furthermore, recent reports note that, following tens of thousands of initial sign-ups, just 112 people were hired by UK farmers last week. Many applicants cited that they could not commit to the full length of the contract, farms were too far away, or they had caring responsibilities and therefore could not work long hours.

Change in consumer demand 

Changes in consumer demand during the coronavirus pandemic, with a move from out-of-home eating to more meals eaten at home – an estimated 500 million more per week – has resulted in some farmers losing their market overnight. This is down to difficulties in redirecting food produce once destined to the foodservice sector, as it been noted that consumers often wont replicate the meals that they would have had out of home, and there are issues with repackaging foods for retail. The impact on dairy farmers has been widely documented with videos of many having to pour away milk – an estimated 1m litres worth – along with the effects on the meat and horticulture sectors. Further to this, farmers have been faced with an increase in the theft of animals by criminals seeking to “cash in” on public concerns about food shortages.

To compound the challenges, the instruction by government to close B&B accommodation and farm cafés amongst other restrictions, and the subsequent loss in public demand, has also impacted farmers who have diversified their sources of income. These diverse streams of income are often vital to small farms’ survival, as many do not make a profit from their farming activity alone, so the financial consequences of this collapse will undoubtedly impact many in the sector.

Using rural lending to diversify…

…into alternative livestock and crops

Rural lending opportunities could help farmers to boost their income by giving them the means to diversify into alternative livestock and crops.

Many farmers are feeling the pinch of increased competition, Brexit uncertainty, and the falling price of milk. In an uncertain economy and a changing industry, diversifying can bring in a valuable source of extra income.

According to Countryfile, over half of the UK’s farmers have now diversified in some form.

Some farmers are choosing to diversify into very different areas like leisure and tourism, which require significant investment to set up.  Diversifying into alternative crops and livestock is less of a jump, uses existing skillsets, and is often more affordable.

Alternative livestock and crop ideas

Here are just a few popular alternative livestock and crop diversification ideas to inspire your new venture.

  • Goat or sheep milk.
  • Quail or duck eggs.
  • Wild boar.
  • Ostriches.
  • Angora rabbit wool.
  • Llama or alpaca wool.
  • Edible flowers or herbs.
  • Pharmaceutical crops.
  • Free-from crops.
  • Pumpkins.
  • Christmas trees.

Rural lending opportunities

For many farmers, diversification is becoming a necessity to stay afloat rather than an option. Whilst diversifying can be daunting, the results can be exciting and rewarding.

For most farmers, taking the plunge and deciding to diversify is aprofitable decision. Some farmers even find that their side-project grows into their main business. However, finding the funds to set it up in the first place can be challenging.

Rural lending opportunities provide farmers with the means to expand and grow their business. Whatever your circumstances, it is worth speaking with a specialist rural lending business like our team here at Richmond Asset Finance to find out more about how our short-term and long-term rural lending services can help you to grow your business and income.

To discuss your vision in more detail, receive free help and advice, or find out what rural finance options are available to you, give our team a call on 0113 288 3277.

Why are so many UK farmers choosing to diversify?

In today’s uncertain economic climate, many UK farmers are choosing to diversify their businessto boost their income.

Government figures show that 62% of UK farmers are now diversifying into other business opportunities to top up the income they make from traditional farming.

According to Farming UK, of the 62% of farmers that have diversified, 94% of the schemes have been financially successful.

So, if you’re not yet diversifying, it may be worth doing some research and speaking with an expert about rural finance to find out if you can get some help with financing your diversification scheme.

Why diversify?

With over half of those farmers diversifying reporting that the income from their alternative business has become ‘vital’ or ‘significant’ to their farm, can farmers afford not to diversify?

Key factors that are pushing farmers in the UK to diversify include:

  • Disease in farm animals.
  • Increased competition.
  • Falling price of milk.
  • Subsidies falling away.
  • Brexit uncertainty.

As with any business, it makes sense for farmers to avoid putting all their eggs in one basket (excuse the pun).

With many farmers owning a substantial amount of land, it makes good business sense that they use all land and buildings owned to their full advantage. Diversifying into alternative markets like leisure and tourism and renewable energy allows farmers to boost their income.

Rural finance to aid diversification

To find out if you can apply for rural finance to help with your diversification scheme, get in touch with our team here at Richmond Asset Finance to discuss your plan in more detail.

Machine Finance Sector Up 9%

Any thoughts of the manufacturing sector being hit by the uncertainty around Britain leaving the EU Certainly hasn’t been felt in the machinery finance sector where growth has hit 9% compared to the previous year.

Analysts say the UK asset finance market as a whole look set for a record period of growth in 2019 on the back of a broadly stable 2018. Last year saw a mixed pattern of growth in some sectors and declines in others. IT asset finance for example saw a fall of 32% while other sectors such as machinery and business equipment finances saw increases, the latter seeing 8% growth in the same period.

Machinery finance may well see further year on year growth in 2019 if manufacturing receives a boost and more business owners take advantage of the temporary tax benefits that will come as a result of taking advantage of new Annual Investment Allowance limits.

Machine finance can be particularly useful for investing factory machinery such as CNC machines, which can be expensive to purchase outright. Machine finance provides a way of investing in machinery without having to risk huge amounts of money which can be better used in expanding business operations, research end development.