Tag: Farming Systems

Finance Options

Typical Finance Types, uses and descriptions

1. Farm Finance, Rural Finance

An all embracing term we use to describe all types of farm and agricultural finance we offer in the rural and country business sectors and which can also be described as Agricultural Finance, Equestrian Finance, Farm Finance, Land Finance and Horticultural Finance. Finance can be provided for holiday complexes, caravan parks, caravan sites, properties with agricultural restrictions, land, buildings, working farms, non-working farms, nurseries, garden centres, smallholdings, estates, fisheries, farm shops and generally all types of rural type situations.

2. Agricultural Loan, Loan for Agriculture, Loans for Agriculture

More commonly described as an Agricultural Mortgage, Mortgage for Agriculture, Agricultural Re-mortgage or Re-mortgage for Agriculture being a loan secured by a first charge over property in UK, England. In some cases a loan may be secured by way of a second charge over this type of property.

3. Bridging Loan, Bridging Finance

This is a short-term arrangement whereby a loan is secured either by way of a first charge or second charge on property in England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. Usually, but not always, interest is rolled up or added to the account so that all the money is repaid by the end of the term, meaning that no monthly payments are made.

Farmers cannot be the forgotten heroes of the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has amplified the uncertainty and fragility of the conditions within which farmers operate.

The coronavirus pandemic has caused us all to become acutely aware of our own mental health, as a “new normal” has emerged. In the UK, there is sharp focus on the mental health of keyworkers supporting the nation in an array of fields such as the NHS, social care and education, but one industry’s contribution that should not be overlooked is the farming and agricultural workforce.

Seasonal labour

Concerns around levels of seasonal labour also predates the pandemic, and concerns have been raised by those within the industry throughout the Brexit debate. UK seasonal farming has been chronically understaffed since the UK voted to Leave and the value of the pound fell. As has been widely documented, an estimated 70,000 seasonal workers are required throughout the year, and around 90 percent of those are from outside the UK. But with restrictions on travel due to coronavirus, farmers in the agricultural, horticultural and dairy industries in particular are reporting severe labour issues.

The Government recently launched its “Pick for Britain” campaign to mobilise a land army of British pickers to help fill farm vacancies. This did not come without concerns from farmers, as many seasonal workers are normally returnees, arriving at the start of the season fully trained in the necessary skills and machinery to hit the ground running. By stark contrast, training new UK recruits can be costly and initially result in lower productivity. Furthermore, recent reports note that, following tens of thousands of initial sign-ups, just 112 people were hired by UK farmers last week. Many applicants cited that they could not commit to the full length of the contract, farms were too far away, or they had caring responsibilities and therefore could not work long hours.

Change in consumer demand 

Changes in consumer demand during the coronavirus pandemic, with a move from out-of-home eating to more meals eaten at home – an estimated 500 million more per week – has resulted in some farmers losing their market overnight. This is down to difficulties in redirecting food produce once destined to the foodservice sector, as it been noted that consumers often wont replicate the meals that they would have had out of home, and there are issues with repackaging foods for retail. The impact on dairy farmers has been widely documented with videos of many having to pour away milk – an estimated 1m litres worth – along with the effects on the meat and horticulture sectors. Further to this, farmers have been faced with an increase in the theft of animals by criminals seeking to “cash in” on public concerns about food shortages.

To compound the challenges, the instruction by government to close B&B accommodation and farm cafés amongst other restrictions, and the subsequent loss in public demand, has also impacted farmers who have diversified their sources of income. These diverse streams of income are often vital to small farms’ survival, as many do not make a profit from their farming activity alone, so the financial consequences of this collapse will undoubtedly impact many in the sector.

Richmond Asset Finance adding value to your farm equipment

Richmond Asset Finance offer financing solutions for farm equipment manufacturers and suppliers in the processing, handling, and storage industries. Plus commercial and retail finance solutions so that distribution partners and authorised dealers have an efficient global distribution network.

Richmond Asset Finance is an all embracing business and we cover all types of farm and agricultural finance we offer to the rural and country business sectors and which can also be described as Agricultural Finance, Equestrian Finance, Farm Finance, Land Finance and Horticultural Finance. Finance can be provided for holiday complexes, caravan parks, caravan sites, properties with agricultural restrictions, land, buildings, working farms, non-working farms, and generally all types of rural type situations.

What purpose might be appropriate for farm finance?

Any legal purposes including but not being limited to repaying debt, repayment of an overdraft, diversification, working capital, business start ups, reducing outgoings, purchases of any kind and development of property or development of business.

Richmond Asset Finance are one of the most reputable sources of rural & farm finance in the UK. We guide and advise you throughout your application process, making sure your individual needs and circumstances always come first. Although we co-operate with a diverse range of banks and financial institutions, we are above all, independent. This means we always tailor a solution that best meets your requirements, not the banks.

We provide farm finance and refinance solutions, bridging finance packages, impartial advice, support and a level of customer service envied by our competitors.

What you need to know about JCB’s first ever fully electric diggers

The first of JCB’s fully electric diggers are rolling off the production line; here’s what you need to know about them.

JCB’s new 19C-1E electric digger can be used either indoors or outdoors but is expected to be particularly popular for indoor and inner-city projects where reducing noise and air pollution is especially important.

JCB Compact Products’ managing director Robert Winter said: “This is a historic moment for JCB and for JCB Compact Products.

“We are delighted to go into full production with the industry’s first fully electric mini excavator. The machine has a very promising future ahead of it.”

The first orders have already been delivered to customers across Europe and North America.

Here is the key information and standout stats about JCB’s first fully electric excavator:

  • They are five times quieter than JCB’s diesel diggers.
  • They can be fully charged for a day’s work in under 2 hours.
  • Charging costs are expected to be 50% cheaper than running a diesel model.
  • Servicing costs are expected to be up to 70% cheaper than a diesel model.

As evidence of the severe and rapid effects of climate change mount, businesses are coming under increasing pressure to become more sustainable and reduce their Co2 emissions. 

Switching to electric vehicles can massively reduce your business’ carbon footprint, helping you to meet your corporate social and environmental responsibilities.

If you require help or advice with financing electric diggers, excavators, or commercial vehicles, speak to our team here at Richmond Asset Finance. We provide a range of flexible vehicle finance and asset finance services to help you to grow your business. 

To discuss your requirements in more detail, give our team a call on 0113 288 3277.

Fresh Push For New Farming System

A new farming system which would see a wider uptake of share farming could enable thousands of young people to get their first foot on the farming ladder according to the Country Land and Business Association.

With the Great Yorkshire Show this week it seemed fitting to keep update with the latest farming news. If a quarter of the country’s farmers aged over 65 entered into share farming agreements, more than 3,000 new entrants could start working the land, the CLA said as it announced a new drive to encourage share farming at the Great Yorkshire Show.

But the campaign is “misguided”, the Tenant Farmers Association said. Chief executive George Dunn said share farming was a way for landowners to benefit from the tax system and that ministers were happy to back the farming model because it was “an easy win”. Instead, effort should be concentrated on securing more long term tenancy arrangements, he said.

CLA president Henry Robinson dismissed the TFA’s criticism, insisting now was the right time to promote share farming because agricultural college’s were full of potential new entrants who were interested in new ways of working: “Share farming not only offers older farmers a way of reducing their workload while maintaining an income but also gives new entrants an increasingly rare opportunity to start a career in agriculture.”

The farming model differs from traditional contract farming, in that both parties share the risk and the profits on a pre-agreed percentage. The existing farmer provides a proportion of his farmland for the partner to deploy their own workforce and machinery.

Environment Minister Owen Paterson said he believes the arrangement had a lot to offer.

“Share farming gives new entrants more opportunities to start a business and build up their skills drawing from farmers with many years’ experience.”

[Yorkshire Post]